Drone Security – Why attend drone conferences

The growth in sales and marketing of drones has exploded over the last two years. The overall expansion of drone use over the last five years ahs led to the increase in conferences and expos related exclusively to drones. These conferences and exhibits all include drone security on the agenda in some form or other. In fact, some of these are exclusive to drone security. Not only those affected adversely recognise drone security as an issue.  Bothe leisure and professional drone users themselves recognising these issues reflects the importance of drone related security.

Drone security – commercial and leisure concerns

The conferences cover every aspect of drone use. From commercial to military use. Hobbyists and Leisure users have their own expos. Public safety has drawn a huge following. Implementation of drones in public safety is becoming mainstream in first world countries. With it drone security issues have arisen too. Anyone considering drone security, drone jamming, and the importance of drone related legislation should seek to attend one or more of these conferences.

Why attend a conference

The reasons behind this are twofold. Keeping up to date with developments in the industry. Secondly you can rest assured that any criminal element will be keeping up with advancements. Positioning yourself so that you stay one step ahead of them is critical. Until recently new technology has involved playing a catch up game with those that use it for criminal purposes. The rapid development and changes in drone security means that those with security concerns can in fact maintain the edge on others.

Whether you choose to stay local for conferences and expos or travel globally will depend entirely on budget. Do not forget however that with new technology, every conference and expo is likely to reveal something new in the industry. Every new development will bring with it an element of drone security. This will also encompass developments in drone related software. Any Change in drone design are critical in security reviews. Design changes could mean that even lightweight drones could carry more weight. Changes like this have a major impact on anti-terrorism and government security considerations.

Understanding the industry

When you attend a conference you will be exposed to the multitude of applications that drones can be used for. This will widen your understanding of the security issues that may affect you directly. Drones are used in industries such as precision agriculture, conservation, public safety, surveying, retail and commercial projects and many more.

Considering personal, public and national safety and thereby familiarising yourself with all current developments may highlight drone security issues. You may in fact encounter some  that you have not previously seen.  Drones used as crop dusters present a good example. Poisoning the food of a local population is therefore a real risk. In construction environments, drones may be used to inspect buildings. Conversely those with less altruistic intentions could use drones to gain information about buildings to commit robberies or worse attacks on the occupants of the building. Long before the building construction has been completed, the risk will be real. Studying how others identify and mitigate these risks will enable any security related professional to apply these strategies before the risk presents itself.

Drone security and leisure use of drones

Even leisure use can present risks. Casual use of drones may just be an afternoon of fun for a leisure user. However, often leisure users can be oblivious of their surroundings and the impact that they have on them. Seemingly simple issues such as blocking local cctv cameras in a crime hotspot can create public safety issues. Drones that can be used to get a close up look of aircraft is an established issue. Currently the lack of enforceable laws to prevent serious risk to others has been a bugbear. Global change in terms of legislation is taking place rapidly. The UK and US are taking the lead.

The size of the conference should not be a determining factor. Smaller conferences specifically have drone defence and drone security as an item on the agenda. This type of agenda may prove to be invaluable. Nobody wants to criminalise the use of drones. Managing their use and implementing strategic security strategies is a core element to making drone technology available to everyone. For the benefit of everyone.

Perhaps the greatest advantage of attending a drone related conference is that it brings like minded people together. Those with security concerns can share ideas and resources. Little happens in isolation, but in unity there is strength.